011 11½ points for inspiring goals

For those listeners out there that might be new to this podcast, this series is for all those out there aspiring to be great business leaders. I will share with you my experience, techniques, and inspiration, to help you live your life successfully, With a background in professional coaching and a career in IT leadership, it is my firm belief that only once you can lead your own successful life, can you become successful at leading others.

 

In this episode of Live It, Lead IT! I will be sharing with you 11 and a half easy to digest points that, should you follow successfully, will enable you to motivate your employees to deliver and achieve their goals, which means you achieve your goals.

Additionally I will introduce myself to you, even on video:

So here goes…

For those listeners out there that might be new to this podcast, this series is for all those out there aspiring to be great business leaders. I will share with you my experience, techniques, and inspiration, to help you live your life successfully, With a background in professional coaching and a career in IT leadership, it is my firm belief that only once you can lead your own successful life, can you become successful at leading others.

In this episode of Live It, Lead IT! I will be sharing with you 11 and a half easy to digest points that, should you follow successfully, will enable you to motivate your employees to deliver and achieve their goals, which means you achieve your goals.

So here goes…

  1. Describe goals positively.

When you share your goals with your employees, don’t tell them what they can’t do. When you say to a child not to do something, it doesn’t work. Instead, tell them what you want them to achieve. This will make the goal more inspirational.

  1. Describe the goal as an end state.

Rather than relaying goals as a process, focus on delivering them in terms of their desired outcome. Avoid statements such as ‘We want to be a better company’. Rather make a bold statement. ‘We are a better company.’ This will help better visualise the outcome.

  1. Keep your employee’s core values front of mind.

Your employees are people, human beings, with their own core values and personal goals. The last episode we spoke about how to get to know your staff better, so you can get the best out of them. If you can master this art, then you will be able to delegate the right tasks to the right people, making for a much more productive workforce.

  1. Be clear on available resources

Make clear what resources your employees can use to achieve their goals. You have to give them resources and time. Make it clear how much time they will have available to them to complete their tasks accordingly.

  1. What are the drivers?

Give your goal context. What are the real drivers behind the goals you set for your employees? For some employees having this kind of background is crucial and enable them to understand the bigger picture. In some instances, it could be that they align the business objectives with their own core values. Be prepared to communicate the wider strategy with those staff that need to hear it.

  1. It’s your job to execute

As a business leader, it will be your job at times to ensure your team delivers on objectives that you might not personally believe are ideal. As part of your role you will need to share these objectives with them nonetheless, but translate them in a way that will still inspire them to complete the job at hand.

  1. Always talk about your objectives.

By doing so, you keep them on the radar. This is essential to long-term planning on the bigger organisational goals.

  1. Allow questions and feedback

It’s critical that you listen to your employees and give them the chance to share their thoughts with you. The best thing that can happen is that they might find a weak spot in your goal definition. This is gold – to uncover these kinds of issues early on will be critical to the success of your project. Ask for their feedback and give them the chance to share their ideas.

  1. Ask for regular updates

Status reports are critical to keeping an eye on the deliverables. Ask for permanent reports. Take an annual objective for example. If you set the target in January, be sure to set aside a half an hour for a status report in your calendar each month to stay on top. You’ll need to show your employees that importance of achieving the tasks at hand by doing so.

  1. Minimize the number of goals

Limit the number of broader objectives you set your employees, ideally between one and three, but make them laser precision in focus. Having too many objectives does not work.

  1. Give them a specific and positive goal

Be sure not to set a process, but a specific objective. Losing weight is the most obvious example among them – people always say that they wish to lose weight. They are always going to fail. It’s not positive. It’s not a process. Instead, set a specific target such as I will weigh 60KG by X time.

11.5 The so-called consequences – the positive and negative.

Some companies are still in the mindset of giving employees bonuses for achieving their objectives. This is completely wrong. Connecting the objectives with a monetary value render their achievement meaningless outside of its financial implications.

We’ll cover this more on this in the next podcast, and that’s why this episode ends on a half note. Happy listening folks.

Yours,

Olaf Kapinski